Welcome to Issue 3 of The Journal, themed around the subject of sculpture.

 

Sculpture is such an accessible, tangible art form – it has a real power of immediacy, and interacts with viewers differently to two-dimensional works. Sculpture can be so visceral, asking to be touched, allowing us to walk around it, interact with it differently. And, in its various shapes and forms, reveals the hand of the artist. 

In this issue, we examine how the very definition (and, subsequently, accepted media used within it) of sculpture has changed in Syria, through Nour Asalia 's essay, The Question of Medium in Syrian Sculpture. 

 

We also spotlight the angular, metal sculptures of Bassel Saadi, who investigates the plane in which the two- and three-dimensional intersect. We also have a conversation with Fadi Yazigi on the challenges faced as he remains within Syria, from the shortage of material, to how current events have pushed a transformation within his works.

 

Finally, we are immensely proud to announce not one, but two exhibitions this autumn – a solo show entitled “Meditation”  by Ziad Dalloul, at the upcoming Abu Dhabi Art (opens 12 November), as well as a group show, “In the Age of New Media” (opening 6 November) at AlSerkal Avenue. 

 

 

 

In the meantime, happy reading!

 

Shireen Atassi & Anna Wallace-Thompson 

 

Features

News
The Journal

News

We are immensely proud to announce not one, but two exhibitions this autumn – a solo show entitled “Meditation”  by Ziad Dalloul, at the upcoming Abu Dhabi Art (opens 12 November), as well as a group show, “In the Age of New Media” (opening 6 November) at AlSerkal Avenue. 

Long Read
The Journal

Long Read

The Question of Medium in Contemporary Syrian Sculpture

What qualifies as an acceptable medium in contemporary artistic practice? More specifically, what qualifies as an acceptable medium within the specific realm of contemporary sculptural practice within Syria? 

Interview
The Journal

Interview

Meet the Artist Fadi Yazigi

One of Syria’s pre-eminent painters and sculptors, Fadi Yadigi’s artworks have become known for their idiosyncratic figures and faces. Refusing to leave his studio in Old Town of Damascus, the onset of the war has had a marked effect on him – from a darker, more bleak outlook evident in his new works, to the challenges faced on a daily basis as he struggles to produce work in a landscape that no longer has the infrastructure to support even some of the most basic of needs.

Spotlight
The Journal

Spotlight

Spotlight: Bassel Saadi and the potential of metal

Working in metal, self-taught sculptor Bassel Saadi has an uncanny knack of imbuing this otherwise cold material with a particular life and energy.